close
Breaking news

Japan’s Emperor Akihito, second from left, and Empress Michiko walk before...read more At least 70 people have been killed in Pakistan At least 70 people — many ...read more Oscar Pistorius was taken to a hospital for injuries suffered in a South African...read more pweeeehhh  Paul Pogba is a Manchester United player once again. After weeks of...read more The President of the Philippines has named over 150 government officials who he ...read more Nearly 100 people were killed in the weekend’s protests in Ethiopia as dem...read more Facebook has fired a warning shot at ad-blocking software by making changes that...read more Tha e Radio – A fire erupted overnight at a Baghdad hospital and killed 11...read more Republican Donald Trump has sparked anger by appearing to suggest his supporters...read more Tha-eRadio: The Rock’s male co-stars in “Fast 8” are all piss...read more Seagate unveiled a 60TB solid state hard drive this week, dethroning Samsung as ...read more Julian Assange will be questioned by Swedish prosecutors inside the Ecuadorian e...read more The long wait for a MacBook Pro refresh appears to be nearing an end, if the lat...read more The government of Ghana has stated that social media will not be blocked during ...read more Gold medal-winner Ryan Lochte and three other members of the US Olympic swimming...read more

Jacob Zuma faces a new vote of no-confidence from his own party

JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) – South Africa’s Jacob Zuma faces a no-confidence vote this month, a new attempt to unseat the president by opponents emboldened by splits within his own party.

Zuma, who is battling corruption allegations, is in a weakened position since he was replaced as leader of the ruling African National Congress (ANC) party in December by Cyril Ramaphosa, the deputy president.

The 75-year-old president is expected to meet the ANC’s six most powerful officials this weekend, but the agenda of the meeting has not been disclosed. Ramaphosa, 65, has been lobbying the ANC’s national executive to force Zuma to resign.

The ANC has said it has discussed Zuma resigning before the end of his term in mid-2019, although his staunch supporters within the party say that will not happen.

Zuma, who has not said whether he will step down voluntarily before his second term as president ends, has been deserted by several prominent allies in the ANC since Ramaphosa took over leadership of what is the only party to govern South Africa since the end of apartheid.

On Friday, parliament speaker Baleka Mbete agreed to a request from the opposition Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) for a motion of no-confidence, though she refused to hold the vote before the president’s state of the nation address on Feb. 8, and scheduled it for Feb. 22.

The rand, which tends to strengthen on signs Zuma could leave office, pared losses on the announcement from parliament.

Investors associate Zuma’s tenure with a period of economic decline, with growth slowing to an average of 1.5 percent a year and unemployment up to 28 percent from around 23 percent when he took office in 2009.

Zuma narrowly survived a no-confidence vote in August, when some ANC lawmakers voted with the opposition.

“STATE CAPTURE” INQUIRY

He has survived several no-confidence votes during his rule thanks to loyal voting by ANC lawmakers, who form a strong parliamentary majority. Although Zuma retains the support of a faction within the ANC, he no longer holds a top post.

In its letter requesting the vote, the EFF said Zuma was not a suitable head of state as he is likely to be embroiled in a judicial inquiry into state corruption. Zuma has denied any wrongdoing.

“The majority of parliament is going to say that Jacob Zuma will not be the president of South Africa because the biggest sentiment, even in the ANC, is saying that Jacob Zuma cannot continue as president,” EFF Deputy President Floyd Shivambu told eNCA television.

Zuma agreed to establish the inquiry into “state capture”, a South African term for government corruption, last month.

Another opposition party, the Democratic Alliance (DA), had lobbied speaker Mbete to postpone the state of the nation address until Zuma had been removed from office.

On Thursday, Mbete said she was aware of “processes going on, every day and every night” over Zuma’s future but he was due to read the state of the nation speech next Thursday as he was still head of state.

Lukhona Mnguni, political analyst at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, said Zuma could take his chances and wait for the no-confidence motion rather than decide to resign.

“Zuma might want to take his chances with the motion and see how many ANC members will come to vote with the opposition and those that would still vote to support him,” Mnguni said.

Credit:Reuters

No Comments

Leave a reply

Post your comment
Enter your name
Your e-mail address

Story Page